Finding Dory (2016) 720p

Movie Poster
Finding Dory (2016) - Movie Poster
Genres:
Animation | Adventure
Resolution:
1280x720
Size:
1.19G
Quality:
720p
Frame Rate:
23.976 (23976/1000) fps
Language:
English  
Run Time:
100 min
IMDB Rating:
7.7 / 10 
MPR:
PG
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Downloaded:
0
Seeds:
0
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0
Directors: Angus MacLane [Director] ,


Movie Description:
Dory is a wide-eyed, blue tang fish who suffers from memory loss every 10 seconds or so. The one thing she can remember is that she somehow became separated from her parents as a child. With help from her friends Nemo and Marlin, Dory embarks on an epic adventure to find them. Her journey brings her to the Marine Life Institute, a conservatory that houses diverse ocean species. Dory now knows that her family reunion will only happen if she can save mom and dad from captivity.

Screenshots

  • Finding Dory (2016) - Movie Scene 1
  • Finding Dory (2016) - Movie Scene 2
  • Finding Dory (2016) - Movie Scene 1

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Reviews

Going away

This is a really good sequel. Taking characters from the first one and putting new ones in there as well, it never gets boring or seems to repetitive. And you don't even have to be Dory, I mean forgetful, for this to work for you. Yes it does make sense to watch the first one (Finding Nemo) then, although I reckon you could watch it and enjoy it as a standalone too.

The characters and their traits are strong and there are a lot of side jokes built in to this too. Humans are being treated like extras and we wouldn't have the time to deal with them anyway. That is apart from one major voice - but it's being highlighted too as if one of the writers or Ellen herself might have a crush there. But you can't blame them for that. On the contrary you can congratulate everyone involved for a really good movie

A Nice Sidetrack to the Original, if Occasionally Over-Similar

Back to the pond for Pixar, where we find things largely unchanged from the end of 2003's Finding Nemo. As the continually-forgetful blue tang Dory has a sudden enduring flash of her childhood, a rush of recall, she gathers the clownfish for one more globe-spanning adventure. The setup is a little soft, lingering too long in the shadow of the first film, but eventually we break free of that sentiment and forge a new (if similar) identity for the sequel. The closed-in landscape of an aquatic themed zoo/amusement park feels a bit claustrophobic at first glance, but as hijinx ensue and we learn more of Dory's early years, it all fleshes out nicely. No shortage of colorful new characters there, literally and figuratively, not the least of which is Ed O'Neill's escape artist "septipus" (having lost a tentacle in the touch tank), who treads dangerously close to becoming a deus ex machina with his versatility. O'Neill brings his usual disgruntled pessimism to the role, though, and some genuinely clever sight gags using the creature's natural assets go a long way to smoothing that over. He's overly convenient, but we're always glad to see him again. Witty and fast-paced, with a good mix of gags for the adults and their kids, plus a potent dose of the studio's famed poignancy. I laughed, I misted up, but I never quite fooled myself into thinking it was superior to the first.

Another hit from Pixar that uses CGI to assist in telling a story...

... rather than using a story to demonstrate dazzling CGI. This film was just as good as its predecessor, Finding Nemo. In this film (which takes place one year after 'Nemo'), Dory, who suffers from short term memory loss, makes it a mission to find her parents. She helped Marlon find Nemo in the first film and now she wants help locating her parents. She became separated from them when she was young and until now, has relied on others to help her find her way. She also gets by with her unique brand of impulsiveness and quick action. Throughout the film, Dory uses other "people's" (fishes'?) words and objects to trigger memories that assist her in finding her way. It was very clever how Pixar incorporated these triggers to help move the story along and flesh out Dory's background. I also liked how they treated short term memory loss with sensitivity and did not make it a joke. The marine center that Dory & co. end up at is based on the excellent Monterrey Bay Aquarium. The funniest new character added to the Nemo franchise is Hank the octopus (except he only has seven legs as Dory points out and refers to him as a "septapus."). Hank is cynical, but you know he's a softy deep inside. He can also camouflage himself into his settings which is quite comical. There are other funny characters like Becky the buzzard and Gerald the seal with a uni-brow.

It seems that Pixar thrives on adding emotional scenes to their films that pull at their audience's heartstrings. Finding Dory is no exception. There is a very dramatic scene near the end of the film where Dory is separated from her party and is lost in an unfamiliar, dark ocean, alone. She has to rely on herself to figure out how to find her way out and find her friends. This was a very heart wrenching scene. I won't lie, it made me tear up and I could hear other people sniffling in the theater. Another emotional scene is the beginning of the film showing a baby Dory with her parents. It's not as sad though as the beginning of Up, though.

I'd recommend this one.
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